Instagram Flikr Twitter Facebook

Crafty Pint

Your Guide to Australian Craft Beer / Friday 22 August 2014

3-ravens-logo
3_ravens_3_gallery
  1. 3_ravens_3_thumbnail
  2. 3-ravens-cask-off_thumbnail
  3. Adrian-aiba-2014_thumbnail
  4. 3-ravens-taps_thumbnail
  5. 3_ravens_4_thumbnail
  6. 3_ravens_9_thumbnail
  7. 3_ravens_1_thumbnail
  8. 3_ravens_2_thumbnail
  9. 3_ravens_5_thumbnail
  10. 3_ravens_6_thumbnail
  11. 3_ravens_7_thumbnail
  12. 3_ravens_8_thumbnail

It started off innocently enough as the name of a beer brewed specially for a wedding. But soon 3 Ravens was taking on a life of its own. By 2003, a microbrewery had opened in a warehouse in northern Melbourne, knocking out traditional European beers and putting them into a handful of nearby pubs. Today, the focus on European styles sold locally remains, but embellished by a range of new, souped up variants of the brewery’s beers.

One of the first to install a traditional, English-style hand pump into a Melbourne pub, they also turn their hands to all manner of limited releases, from past favourites such as the Ale Noir – their Dark smoke beer aged in a French oak barrel previously used for pinot noir – and the Ravenator Bock to popular repeats like the USB and more recent beasts such as the whisky barrel-aged Black Mass and Pedro Ximinez aged Druid.

In 2013, as it approached its tenth birthday – and with a 10th anniversary beer in the tank – it looked like it could be curtains for the brewery as disagreements among its original owners led to the business being put up for sale. WA’s Mash Brewing, which was looking for somewhere to brew its beers on the East Coast, came riding to the rescue and the site now brews 3 Ravens and Mash specialty beers.

The new owners also set out pumping money into the brewery, carrying out a spot of rebranding and investing in new equipment. It seems to have been a wise move by them too. In 2014, 3 Ravens was named Champion Small Australian Brewery at the Australian International Beer Awards and also picked up Best British Ale for its slightly tweaked English Ale / ESB.

They’ve been opening up the brewery to the public more too, most notably during Good Beer Week when it has played host to sell out events such as Cask Off and Woods of the North at which 100s of punters have flocked to sample cask and barrel-aged beers from the hosts and some of their friends from the Aussie beer world.

Regulars

3 Ravens White

Pouring with a light white head, this traditional Belgian witbier (or “white beer”) has a pungent fruity aroma that hints at Juicy Fruit gum that comes from the addition of citrus peel, coriander and chamomile in the boil. Those flavours come through in the mouth along with pepper and peach before the beer finishes tart on the palate.

Style: Witbier
Strength: 5.2%

3-ravens-white_bottle

3 Ravens Golden

Formerly known as their Blond, the 3 Ravens Golden Ale is a German style altbier (“old” beer) with a lightly floral, slightly spicy aroma from the use of Saaz hops from the Bohemia region of the Czech Republic and a smooth, biscuity malt flavour and gentle hop bitterness. An nicely quaffable beer.

Style: Golden Ale
Strength: 5%

3-ravens-golden_bottle

3 Ravens English Ale

A recreation of the classic English pub ales, this uses the Maris Otter malt and Fuggles hops found in many UK beers. Burnished copped in colour, the hops are of the earthy, grassy variety and lend the beer a lingering, floral aftertaste and mild bitterness – although not before your palate’s experienced a little chocolate and the slightest hint of smokiness from the malts. Originally designed for cask conditioning – and very occasionally found in said format – it was tweaked to become a little fuller bodied in 2013. It was a wise tweak as the beer then picked up Best British Ale at the 2014 Australian International Beer Awards.

Awards: Best British Ale at 2014 AIBA

Style: English Pale Ale
Strength: 4.6%

3-ravens-english_bottle

3 Ravens Black

The 3 Ravens stout, this is as jet black as a raven itself, yet is a surprisingly smooth, balanced take on the style, showing off plenty of coffee and dark chocolate flavours, underpinned by some sweet caramel and an espresso like finish, without the sharper bitterness you can find in some stouts. Comprised of ten different grains, it’s a smooth treat occasionally – very occasionally – found on handpump.

Style: Stout
Strength: 5.5%

3-ravens-black_bottle

3 Ravens 55

Today, it’s probably harder to find an Aussie brewer who doesn’t have a highly hopped US style ale on their roster. But when the 55 first rolled off the 3 Ravens production line, it was one of few. Made up of five different grain and five different hop varieties, it boasts a mix of big passionfruit and pineapple aromas typical of American hop varieties and more grassy varieties with a full flavour and serious hit of bitterness.

Style: US Pale Ale
Strength: 5.5%

3-ravens-55_bottle

3 Ravens Dark Ale

One for the more adventurous, this is a rare Australian take on the Bavarian smoke beer style. The use of smoked malts gives it a beechwood and smoked bacon aroma and a lightly peaty flavour.

Style: Rauchbier (Smoke Beer)
Strength: 5.2%

3-ravens-dark-beer_bottle

Specials

3 Ravens Druid

You can tell 3 Ravens head brewer Adrian McNulty is being given free rein in the brewery these days. The man has musical tastes of a particularly dark, intense and heavy shade of black and the creation of beers such as Black Mass – a whisky barrel-aged chipotle and vanilla porter – and now this Pedro Ximenez barrel-aged Belgian strong dark ale named Druid would seem to reflect brew days soundtracked by intense aural assaults. Having enjoyed the Druid on tap and from the bottle, we feel that maybe more brewers could experiment with drowning themselves in waves of intestine-rumbling drone. The brewery originally obtained the Pedro Ximenez barrels on loan and decided to try and create a beer that reflected the drink that once inhabited them. They brewed a Belgian quadrupel, filled four barrels, left them a while, then blended all four back together before kegging and bottling. The result is a wonderfully complex beer, awash with sweet, fortified wine aromas, stewed fruits, soft, creamy chocolate malts, hints of oak and much more besides. The only downside is that the barrels have now been returned from whence they came so the beer may never be repeated.

Available:

McCoppins
McCoppins Abbotsford
Blackhearts & Sparrows
Slowbeer
Purvis Cellars
Carwyn Cellars
Low Buy Liquor
Public Brewery
The Catfish
Royal Hotel Clifton Hill
The Park Hotel
Gin Palace

Style: Barrel-aged Belgian Quad
Strength: 11.0%

3-ravens-druid_bottle

3 Ravens USB (Uber Special Bitter)

On the night of the 2014 Australian International Beer Awards, shortly after 3 Ravens head brewer Adrian McNulty had collected the trophy for Champion Small Australian Brewery, we asked one of his colleagues: “Does this mean Adrian will be allowed to brew USB again?” The beer – essentially a souped up version of their English Ale – was always a favourite at Crafty Towers but, when the brewery was taken over by Mash in 2013 the brewing of all limited release beers was put on hiatus to focus on the core range. “We just brewed it!” came the reply. And, thus, they departed the evening happy, laden down with trophies, and we departed happy in the knowledge that our favourite Ravens beer was coming back. It’s back in the larger, old-fashioned bottles those who remember the old Uber range from the brewery will recall and, barring a minor tweak to the label and the hops (because they couldn’t lay their hands on one variety in particular), it’s the same as before: a rich, layered, deep amber coloured beer dominated by hearty toffee malts. The change in hops gives it a more citrusy aroma then we recall from the past, but the raisiny dark fruit and spicy characteristics remain in what’s a fine beer to be supping on these cold, winter evenings.

Available:

McCoppins
McCoppins Abbotsford
Blackhearts & Sparrows
Slowbeer
Purvis Cellars
Carwyn Cellars
Low Buy Liquor
Public Brewery
The Catfish

Style: Strong English Bitter
Strength: 6.2%

3-ravens-usb-2014_bottle

3 Ravens Black Mass

On the last weekend of Good Beer Week 2014, 3 Ravens opened its brewery doors and invited 200 guests in to sample barrel-aged beers of their and their peers' creation. One of the beers it debuted that day was Black Mass, which has since remained under wraps while collecting a gold medal at the Australian International Beer Awards. Only a handful of kegs were ever produced; little surprise, perhaps, when you understand the lengths that went to in order to fill them. The base beer – essentially a porter featuring some peated distilling malt – was brewed in February then transferred to a Starward whisky cask. While it did its merry thing in there, brewer Adrian McNulty steeped some vanilla pods and chipotle chillis in vodka, ready to be added to the beer once it left the barrel. The result is a fiercely complex dark beast – black with a ruby (blood?) tinge – that’s simultaneously smoky and oaky, with vanilla and whisky aromas and a distinctly throat-tingling chilli heat completing the picture.

Available:

Royston
The Terminus
Then one more keg to appear somewhere, some day…

Awards: Gold Medal AIBA 2014

Style: Barrel-aged chipotle vanilla porter

3-ravens-black-mass_bottle

3 Ravens / Two Birds / ParrotDog Fly By Night

It seems like this three-way, trans-Tasman collaboration brewed during Good Beer Week was some time in the making. As soon as 3 Ravens brewer Adrian McNulty heard there was to be a second avian-themed brewery in Victoria, namely Two Birds, he set his mind on brewing with them. When the idea was eventually suggested (as beers were consumed), it was decided it would be a good idea to bring in Kiwi brewers ParrotDog too, what with their feathery, winged nature.

Thus it was that on the Monday of Good Beer Week, the three came together to create this black IPA, which looks to represent each of the three breweries. It’s black for the All Blacks and uses hops and liberal amounts of naked golden oats for the green and gold of Australia (rather than any particular love of nude brewing). There’s plenty of US Tomahawk and Falconer’s Flight used for late and dry-hopping with the result, according to the concept’s instigator Adrian, that: “It tastes @#$%ing sensational. It’s a style I really enjoy and we’re all very proud of it.”

Available:

Six kegs are off to NZ, a few are already gone, but the others can be found at:
The Park Hotel (although may be gone already)
The Wheaty (being tapped end of July)
Village Melbourne
Beer DeLuxe
Woodlands Hotel

Style: Black IPA
Strength: 6.6%

Fly-by-night_bottle

3 Ravens / Boneyard / Mash Crematorium

The Yeastie Boys and Tasmania’s Seven Sheds may have released 100 per cent peated malt beers but this may take the prize for the beer with the most diverse range of smoked elements in the history of beer. A join project between 3 Ravens, Mash Brewing (who rescued 3 Ravens when it looked like they could be lost last year) and Boneyard Brewing (the spin-off from Josie Bones that brews at 3 Ravens) it’s got smoked malts, smoked hops and smoked tea (thanks to a dry tea-bagging process).

Inspired by Mash and 3 Ravens respective smoked beers (Deville and Dark), Josie Bones' hop-smoking technique, a love of peated malt and some hops beloved of the brewers, it was brewed specially for Josie Bones' Good Beer Week events and, while only a tiny amount was brewed (and a tinier amount bottled) there is still a little around. Crematorium features two types of beechwood-smoked malt as well as peat smoked malt and a hint of dark Munich malt, Glacier and Styrian Goldings hops, and was fermented to 8 per cent ABV with a blend of German Ale and Kolsch yeasts. The beer was dry hopped with fresh Victorian Galaxy hops, hand-picked by Hop Products Australia and couriered wet to Josie Bones, where they were carefully hot and cold smoked by owner Chris Badenoch over hops and malleewood. The final twist was an addition of Russian Caravan tea, a Chinese black tea smoked over pine wood and pine cones.

According to Brendan from Boneyard: “The result is a golden, hoppy, smokey and mildly tannic strong ale which we hope will excite even the most fatigued of palates.”

Label artwork by Brendan Ninness

Available:

3 Ravens
Josie Bones

Style: Smoked Strong Ale
Strength: 8.0%
Bitterness: 41 IBU

Crematorium__by_brendan_ninness_lr_bottle

3 Ravens Bittersweet End

Melbourne’s 3 Ravens marked 10 years of brewing beers this year. We say “marked” rather than “celebrated” as things haven’t necessarily gone as planned, what with the building and brewery appearing to be on sale at one point and the whole affair looking close to disappearing. A solution has been found (we’ll bring you news on that soon) and the tenth anniversary beer is here too. The aim was to create a 100 IBU (international bitterness unit), 10 per cent beer to mark the occasion. And, in keeping with how the occasion turned out, it ended up just short, measuring 100 IBU and 9.6 per cent ABV. It being an Imperial IPA named appropriately – in more ways than one – Bittersweet End. Chock full of mostly American hops, namely Simcoe, Citra, Chinook, Amarillo and Horizon, with a dash of homegrown Galaxy for good measure, it’s a hazy copper affair that demands lazy drinking. The aroma from its off white head is a mix of sweet toffee-like malts, spicy booze and hops and a touch of pine too. In the mouth, it’s creamy, almost oily, with those piney characters joined by herbal, almost woody hop characters balanced by sweet malts. The bitterness is there in spades, but isn’t out of control, while the booze lends it an element of rummy stewed fruits. One to approach slowly, which is just as well as there are only 16 cases in existence.

Available:

Rainbow Hotel
Nillumbik Cellars
Carwyn Cellars
McCoppins
Bar Etiquette
Mrs Parma’s
Purvis Cellars
Purvis Beer Richmond
Valley Cellar Door
Swords Select
Raccoon Bar
Belgian Beer Café
Slowbeer
Oscars Ale House
Harvest Wine & Liquor

Style: Imperial IPA
Strength: 9.6%
Bitterness: 100 IBU

3ravens-bittersweet_bottle

3 Ravens Prussian Porter

Word on the hopbine suggests 3 Ravens will live on, despite earlier fears, with a white knight on the distant horizon. Should that not prove to be the case and were this to be the final special release from the Thornbury brewer it would be a fitting farewell. A year in the making from the time of its brewing followed by a few months in barrels also used for beers such as the Double Ale Noir, it has now been deemed ready for release, following an early taster in cask form at Good Beer Week’s Bull and Raven Cask Off. It’s not for the faint-hearted with all manner of leathery, smoky characters mingling with the vanilla and dark fruits on the nose and plenty of heavy flavours to play with too. It’s alternately tarry and fortified, rich and roasty, warming and like a mouthful of molasses. In other words, one to sip and savour.

Available:

3 Ravens
Slowbeer
Harvest Wine & Liquor
Others tbc

Style: Prussian Porter
Strength: 8%

3-ravens-pruss-porter_bottle

3 Ravens Smoked Wheat

The Thornbury brewery continues to plunder every nook and cranny of the Germanic beer world, coming at us this time with a beer that combines elements of two of their regular beers: a bit of smoked malt and a bit of fruity wheat beer yeast. It might sound an unusual combination to the newcomer – mixing elements of earthy, woody, campfire like aromas with the banana and clove esters of the wheat yeast – but they sit together rather well. It’s not bananas on the barbie, instead a cloudy copper coloured beer with a surprisingly full body for a reasonably low alcohol content beer and some malty sweetness.

Available:

3 Ravens
Blackhearts & Sparrows
Biero

Style: Smoked Wheat Beer
Strength: 4.7%

3-ravens-smoke-wheat_bottle

3 Ravens Oktoberfestbier

Of all the breweries in Australia, few have as much experience playing around with German lager styles as 3 Ravens. Their Oktoberfestbier sticks true to the German fest beers, undergoing cold fermentation and spending four weeks lagering at the brewery prior to release. The result is a seriously malty lager, one that pours a deep amber and has a sweet, biscuity malt aroma. It’s all about the malts in the mouth too, with rich toffee and biscuit flavours leading the way and a hop bitterness that’s pretty restrained in a beer that’s surprisingly 6.3%.

Available:

3 Ravens
The Local Taphouse Darlo
The Local Taphouse St Kilda
Courthouse Hotel
Beer DeLuxe

Style: Oktoberfestbier
Strength: 6.3%

3-ravens-oct-bier_bottle

3 Ravens Ale Noir

It’s been seen this year in “Double” form and now the Thornbury’s brewery’s barrel-aged version of their smoky Dark Ale is back in normal “Ale Noir” fashion. The story behind it sees the brewers pop some of the Dark into a barrel once used for pinot noir and let the two go to work for a few months. The result aroma-wise this time around is low on wine characteristics, but high on the oak and smoke, both of which make an appearance once imbibed amid swirls of dark malts that range from the sweet to the roasty. Carbonation’s kept pretty low, contributing to a body that’s light to medium, with the brewers recommending it’s quaffed at 10C.

Available:

3 Ravens
Slowbeer

Style: Barrel-Aged Smoke Beer
Strength: 5.4%

3-ravens-logo-special_bottle

3 Ravens Ravenator Bock

One of the best received of 3 Ravens' limited run releases in 2010, the marvelously named Ravenator is back. Another to take its inspiration from Germany, this is a strong lager, one that was traditionally brewed dark, which is certainly the case here. Treated lovingly, as it should be, with a lengthy period of cool fermentation and maturation at the brewery prior to release, it’s a beer from the Thornbury brewers to reward those who love their malts. On the nose, they come in the form of sweeter, caramel types, with a touch of roastiness, while in the mouth you’ll find the likes of toffee and chocolate giving way to roast, coffee, even smoky notes and a long, lingering dry finish. A lager designed for the colder weather and one that the brewers claim should be poured with “an initial ‘flourish’ to activate the head”. We recommend a triple salchow and curtsy, finished off by throwing your arms wide like Sgt Elias at the end of Platoon.

Available:

Biero
Courthouse Hotel
Purvis Beer Richmond
3 Ravens

Style: Bock
Strength: 5.9%

3-ravens-bock_bottle

3 Ravens Rye

This is the return of a beer that first made an appearance in 2010. It’s 3 Ravens' take on the pretty rare Roggenbier style of wheat beer from Bavaria that combines a wheat beer yeast with rye malt. Last year’s was one of the more intriguing specials to roll out of the Thornbury brewery, blending many of the characteristics you’d expect from a wheat beer accompanied by a distinct, almost peppery spiciness. This year’s is one that seems to have got the brewers feeling all florid, as they describe the colour as “burnt sienna” – a description that forced us into a dictionary. It means yellow-brown, apparently. They also talk of a “dense, rocky head leaving delicate lacing on the glass for the duration”. On the nose, we’re told to expect clove plus hints of cinnamon, carraway and banana bread. In the mouth, it’s all about caramel and toffee flavours and (continuing their colourful description) “some distinct pumpernickel bread/rye characteristics” backed up by a hint of noble hop bitterness.

Available:

3 Ravens
Courthouse Hotel
Beer DeLuxe
The Local Taphouse St Kilda
Carwyn Cellars
Valley Cellar Door

Style: Roggenbier
Strength: 5.6%

3-ravens-roggenbier_bottle

3 Ravens Hell

When done right, the lagers – or helles – originating from the southern German state of Bavaria are among the very best in the world: delicate, beautifully balanced and as refreshing a beer as you could ever wish to taste. We’ve not had the chance to taste this 3 Ravens take on the style yet, so will have to rely on the brewer’s notes, which tell us it’s a light gold/dark straw coloured lager with a dense head and moderate carbonation. On the nose, we’re told to expect a “light, clean malt and grain like aroma” with “very light flowery hop notes”, while once it’s passed your lips, expect a “sweet malty flavour”, a “low level of bitterness” and a “truly sessionable beer”.

Available:

3 Ravens
Slowbeer
Courthouse Hotel
Josie Bones

Style: Hell Lager
Strength: 5.0%

3-ravens-logo-special_bottle

3 Ravens Schwarz

While most brewers seem to be hotfooting it after the latest hop varieties and chasing ever bigger hop fixes, 3 Ravens are happily playing around with malt led beers (and the odd barrel too). The latest release in their Uber Range is another inspired by classic European styles, this time a Schwarzbier, aka a dark lager. It registers in the realms of dark brown – with an orangey tinge when held to the light – rather than black and, as we said, is all about the malts. On the nose that translates to some bready and caramel characters – even a suggestion of coca cola, whereas in the mouth you’ll find sweeter syrupy flavours mixed with lots of chocolate before it’s all wrapped up by some roastiness that comes to the party late then sticks around. Only as you make your way down the glass does the 6%-plus alcohol become apparent, adding a little tingle in cahoots with the gently spicy hops.

Available:

Courthouse Hotel
The Local Taphouse St Kilda
Blackhearts & Sparrows

Style: Schwarzbier
Strength: 6.3%

3-ravens-logo-special_bottle

3 Ravens Double Ale Noir

The latest limited release (very limited release) from 3 Ravens has undergone quite a journey. It takes the concept of last year’s first Ale Noir (a Geelong Pinot Noir barrel-aged take on their Dark smoke beer) and adds another dimension. The barrel that was used last time around was refilled with Dark beer which spent ten months maturing. A second batch of Dark was placed into a fresh Pinot barrel for six weeks and then the two were blended. The result is a 6.5% beer that brewer Dave Brough says has “a big oaky, vanilla and earthy phenolic nose”. There’s a thinner body than last year’s as there was less malt to “fatten it up”, he says, which along with the slightly acidic notes and long, dry finish give it a vinous character. As for the palate, it’s “a full bodied Pinot spiced with subtle malt sweetness and peated Scotch notes”. There’s only the tiniest handful of kegs so keep your eyes peeled for where they turn up. It will also be released in 750ml bottles and Crafty will be grabbing one next week for a sample.

Available:

Josie Bones
Courthouse Hotel
Slowbeer
Valley Cellar Door
Carwyn Cellars
Blackhearts & Sparrows

Style: Oak Aged Smoke Beer
Strength: 6.5%

3-ravens-double-ale-noir_bottle

3 Ravens Uber Blond

It might sound like the return of Brigitte Nielsen, but this is in fact the latest release under Thornbury brewer 3 Raven’s Uber range, one which sees them take their Blond (or Golden Ale, depending how you know it) as a starting point then head into strong lager territory. Looking towards Europe – in particularly Germany – it’s a recreation of an altbier, albeit something of an Uber version of that (its subtitle “Sticke Alt” means secret altbier – the one you’d have to request from the publican with a nod and a wink). The recipe puts a greater emphasis on the toasty malts, which leads to rich toffee flavours, with a hint of orange, while the hops are very much in the background, only creeping up with a little bit of a spicy tickle once you’re a few mouthfuls in. Higher fermentation temperatures than used with the normal Blond add some fruity esters, while a lengthy period of conditioning at 1C ensures it pours a clear copper colour.

Available:

3 Ravens
Slowbeer
Baden Powell Hotel
Courthouse Hotel
Carwyn Cellars

Style: Altbier
Strength: 6.4%
Bitterness: 30 IBU

Uber-blond_bottle

3 Ravens USB

On a trip to the UK last Christmas, Crafty noticed some of the brewers behind the UK’s more popular real ale brands, such as Abbot and Old Speckled Hen had started releasing souped up “vintage” versions. And very nice they were too. It’s a similar approach that 3 Ravens has taken here with the second release of their Uber Special Bitter – a bigger, stronger version of their English Ale. Thicker in mouthfeel, darker in colour (an enticing dark rusty hue) and higher in alcohol, it’s not crazily “uber”, more a highly enjoyable, richly caramelised ale with a lengthy and pretty solid bitterness in which the fruity esters of the English ale yeast come through with added intensity.

Available:

Slowbeer
Purvis Beer
Blackhearts & Sparrows
Mrs Parma’s
Oscar’s Alehouse
Courthouse Hotel
Valley Cellar Door

Style: Extra Special Bitter
Strength: 6.1%

3-ravens-usb_bottle

3 Ravens Rye

The latest in the 3 Ravens' ‘Uber" series, in which the Thornbury brewers pick a style from their usual range and do something a bit special with it, the Rye is loosely based on their White (or witbier). It’s a Roggenbier, a style originally heralding from Bavaria, in which the yeast strain used in wheat beers is combined with a hefty whack of rye malt – a type of malt rarely used in beers today, although becoming increasingly popular in the US craft scene and among Aussie homebrewers. The result here is a dark copper-coloured beer with a dense white head, a sweet, spicy aroma and a tangy fruit flavour reminiscent of wheat beers but with an added malt sweetness and serious peppery bite.

Available:

3 Ravens Brewery
Slowbeer
Blackhearts & Sparrows
Oscar’s Alehouse
Purvis Beer
Carwyn Cellars
Harvest Wines
The Terminus
Beer DeLuxe

Style: Roggen bier (Rye beer)
Strength: 5.7%

3-ravens-roggenbier_bottle